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Thread: Petrol or Diesel?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shorty View Post
    During my time with tourans had 4 of them 2 on motability at the time and 2 of my own at a later time the I found the 2.0 was more economical because with a bigger engine you have to work it less to make progress and better for motorway cruising and it has more pulling power than the 1.6 to cope with the weight of the car. Generally speaking with diesels ive found your usually better off with a bigger engine than a smaller one.
    An interesting article from Equa Index Data does support this view to an extent. Smaller petrol and Diesel engines do well in lab conditions where there are no hills turns or operating air conditioning or passengers. When confronted with real life conditions with passengers and hills the smaller engine cars are basically underpowered and struggle.
    Overall, the Emissions Analytics data showed that cars with small engines had the biggest gap between official fuel economy and actual performance, and those with the biggest engines had the smallest gaps.
    The Fiesta petrol returned just 38.7 against 65.7 but a BMW M140i returned 35 against 39.8.
    The Golf 1.6 diesel and 308 1.6 diesel both claim 88.3 but only managed 53.
    More worryingly, and getting back on track with the thread, new diesels are spewing out 4x the Nitrous Oxide they officially claim. I think over the next 10 years we shall see a sharp decline in new diesel vehicles. I would also caution against small petrol engines as these do not have the durability of larger ones and in reality offer little improvement in fuel efficiency. In my view 1.4 is small enough.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by fwipperie View Post
    An interesting article from Equa Index Data does support this view to an extent. Smaller petrol and Diesel engines do well in lab conditions where there are no hills turns or operating air conditioning or passengers. When confronted with real life conditions with passengers and hills the smaller engine cars are basically underpowered and struggle.
    Overall, the Emissions Analytics data showed that cars with small engines had the biggest gap between official fuel economy and actual performance, and those with the biggest engines had the smallest gaps.
    The Fiesta petrol returned just 38.7 against 65.7 but a BMW M140i returned 35 against 39.8.
    The Golf 1.6 diesel and 308 1.6 diesel both claim 88.3 but only managed 53.
    More worryingly, and getting back on track with the thread, new diesels are spewing out 4x the Nitrous Oxide they officially claim. I think over the next 10 years we shall see a sharp decline in new diesel vehicles. I would also caution against small petrol engines as these do not have the durability of larger ones and in reality offer little improvement in fuel efficiency. In my view 1.4 is small enough.

    mmm the first bit here says it all where there are no hills etc or not operating air conditioning etc I think people generally have and do both and thats where you would notice it plus as I say there is more low down torque so you can get up to speed required quicker and easier without putting more strain on the engine. The 1,4 tsi petrol was on carwow yesterday in an audi and I think he was only getting the 30's mpg not too good really.

  3. #13
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    Also worth bearing in mind a lot of the new breed of small 'economical' petrol engines are turbocharged which bring their own reliability issues, I've heard some horror stories around Fords 1.0 ecoboost engine in particular. Not something to be overly concerned about if you lease through motability but I'd be very wary of buying one.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shorty View Post
    mmm the first bit here says it all where there are no hills etc or not operating air conditioning etc I think people generally have and do both and thats where you would notice it plus as I say there is more low down torque so you can get up to speed required quicker and easier without putting more strain on the engine. The 1,4 tsi petrol was on carwow yesterday in an audi and I think he was only getting the 30's mpg not too good really.
    Speaking from actual experience I get 38 MPG in the city with the 1.4 VW TSi engine in a Golf and was getting 42 MPG with my previous 1.6 TDi engine. I’m no granny either and if I really wanted too I think I could squeeze a few more miles per gallon with the 1.4 but I’d die of boredom and fall asleep at the wheel using the light right foot treatment.

    0 to 60 is just under 9 seconds for the 1.4 (load with two reasonably heavy adults and a 42 KG scooter in the boot) and about a second to two seconds slower for the 1.6 TDi.

    I’m looking forward to VW’s new 1.5 TSi due soon and promises to be even more powerful and fuel efficient than the 1.4 TSi.
    Last edited by ChrisK; 04-20-2017 at 01:32 PM.

  5. #15
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    I've always disliked diesel powered cars because they take too long to heat up, most of my city journeys are less than 2 miles so my feet would be freezing if I were driving a diesel.

    I too found a VW Golf DSG 1.4 petrol excellent on petrol and I never bothered using the Start/Stop feature.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mortimus View Post
    Also worth bearing in mind a lot of the new breed of small 'economical' petrol engines are turbocharged which bring their own reliability issues, I've heard some horror stories around Fords 1.0 ecoboost engine in particular. Not something to be overly concerned about if you lease through motability but I'd be very wary of buying one.
    I concur. A friend who works in the car industry knows of several Ford's who are on their second ecoboost engine after just 2-3 years. The engine has to spin much faster which invariably leads to more wear and poor reliability. A new engine out if warranty would cost around 4 ir 5 grand.

  7. #17
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    I think it's all about where you drive & how many miles you cover.

    For me, I rarely drive in a town & cover over 13k miles per year on mainly motorways & fast A roads. This is the domain of the diesel.

    Last week I test drove a Kia Niro petrol hybrid when the salesman offered as he saw me notice the car. Lovely car, but it isn't quite the long distance motorway cruiser that I want & can't accomodate my larger wheelchair. If I did less long distance & more town driving & could survive with my small wheelchair it would have been a great car for me.

    So, after looking for a petrol hybrid to suit my needs, I've ended up ordering another large diesel car, the Alhambra. Maybe the next car will be a petrol hybrid if the manufacturers make one that suits my needs, but for so many the petrol hybrids of today are now worthy of consideration.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gothitjulie View Post
    I think it's all about where you drive & how many miles you cover.

    For me, I rarely drive in a town & cover over 13k miles per year on mainly motorways & fast A roads. This is the domain of the diesel.

    Last week I test drove a Kia Niro petrol hybrid when the salesman offered as he saw me notice the car. Lovely car, but it isn't quite the long distance motorway cruiser that I want & can't accomodate my larger wheelchair. If I did less long distance & more town driving & could survive with my small wheelchair it would have been a great car for me.

    So, after looking for a petrol hybrid to suit my needs, I've ended up ordering another large diesel car, the Alhambra. Maybe the next car will be a petrol hybrid if the manufacturers make one that suits my needs, but for so many the petrol hybrids of today are now worthy of consideration.
    It would not surprise me if Motability announce soon that only Petrol (and Electric) cars will be available on the scheme, say from Q2 or Q3. The government is replacing all its diesel fleet cars as are many local authorities and this would be inline with current policy.

  9. #19
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    Motability Operations purchase c200,000 cars per year and for the last few years have represented between 8 - 10% of all car registered in the UK. Typically leasing companies want an asset portfolio which minimises risk and Motability Operations is no different (many of their management are ex Leaseplan). It is therefore unlikely that they will make a sudden change and remove diesel. It is more likely that they will reflect changes in taxation and the market which will gradually make diesel less popular. Interestingly this happened the other way round in the early noughties when Motability moved from less than 5% diesel to more than 40% over a few years. Probably the opposite will happen now!

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Damsonjam View Post
    Motability Operations purchase c200,000 cars per year and for the last few years have represented between 8 - 10% of all car registered in the UK. Typically leasing companies want an asset portfolio which minimises risk and Motability Operations is no different (many of their management are ex Leaseplan). It is therefore unlikely that they will make a sudden change and remove diesel. It is more likely that they will reflect changes in taxation and the market which will gradually make diesel less popular. Interestingly this happened the other way round in the early noughties when Motability moved from less than 5% diesel to more than 40% over a few years. Probably the opposite will happen now!
    A lot will depend upon projected resale values which if lower will result in higher AP, possibly making some uneconomic to offer.

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