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Thread: Diabetes - Who do we believe

  1. #1
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    Diabetes - Who do we believe

    My wife for some 10 years has had Type 2 Diabetes, although kept under control with medication.

    She attends her surgery held by her GP as a Diabetic clinic, whom monitors her function levels from Bloods and amends her medication as and when needed.

    She also attends the Hospital under a consultant who does the same monitors her levels from the same Bloods as they are on the NHS network.

    The consultant now says she is on far too high a level of insulin, and has placed her under a Diabetic nurse at a local hospital. The nurse says the same that her amounts are high. She will help to bring these amounts down which will help her kidneys and reduce her weight. Also first time in 10 years she has had more info of the do's and don'ts from the nurse and some advice to help with her diet reducing the bad carbs.

    She has never been offered a session with Diabetic Dietitian and only the last month the Diabetic Nurse.

    Yet is the GP who has controlled Diabetes from the beginning.

    So who are she to believe, GP Consultant or Nurse.............

  2. #2
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    GP stands for 'General' Practicioner, ie. someone who knows a lot of general information about a lot of conditions and diseases.

    A Consultant, and 'dedicated' nurses, deal with one certain type of condition, day in day out.

    Who do you believe has the most knowledge of a particular condition and how best to treat it, a generalist or a specialist?

    Usually consultants, and specialist nurses, contact the GP and advise/tell him what treatment is needed.
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    Thanks,
    Thats more or less what we've thought.
    But when she visited the nurse, one thing she asked was about. Was to describe her diet and has she seen a diabetic dietitian. The nurse was surprised she had not and she is not the first who asked the same question.
    So who would be responsible to arrange that GP, Consultant or Nurse

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    Yet is the GP who has controlled Diabetes from the beginning.
    There lies your wife's problem, it is her who is meant to control her diabetes GP's and practice nurse's know diddley squat about diabetes a nurse at the surgery goes to a half day session and gets a certificate for doing so. A GP probably covers diabetes in first year of training in the class room for 10 mins.

    Do be warned at the so called specialist dietitian as some not all seem to think it's great to encourage eating starchy carbs.
    Either the practice nurse or the GP should have arranged an apt with the dietitian.

    Your wife should be testing before meals and two hours after as she is on insulin and before bed as well. This way she will soon know what her numbers are like and adjust her insulin accordingly. Even though this link is for type 1's hopefully it will help her with a better understanding of her diabetes https://www.bertieonline.org.uk/

    No1 rule is look after your own diabetes and yourself as the medics haven't a clue.

  5. #5
    Senior Member gus607's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cornwall View Post
    There lies your wife's problem, it is her who is meant to control her diabetes GP's and practice nurse's know diddley squat about diabetes a nurse at the surgery goes to a half day session and gets a certificate for doing so. A GP probably covers diabetes in first year of training in the class room for 10 mins.

    Do be warned at the so called specialist dietitian as some not all seem to think it's great to encourage eating starchy carbs.
    Either the practice nurse or the GP should have arranged an apt with the dietitian.

    Your wife should be testing before meals and two hours after as she is on insulin and before bed as well. This way she will soon know what her numbers are like and adjust her insulin accordingly. Even though this link is for type 1's hopefully it will help her with a better understanding of her diabetes https://www.bertieonline.org.uk/

    No1 rule is look after your own diabetes and yourself as the medics haven't a clue.
    Absolute rubbish. My GP & practice nurse recently as good as saved my life because of thier expertise with diabetes. To make statements like yours is an insult to the good medical professionals which there are many.
    Call me Mike.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by gus607 View Post
    Absolute rubbish. My GP & practice nurse recently as good as saved my life because of thier expertise with diabetes. To make statements like yours is an insult to the good medical professionals which there are many.
    All I can say is your practice nurse and Dr must be one of the few. It's a well known fact that practice nurses and GP's have very little knowledge of diabetes. Have a read of the many diabetes forums and you will find this out for yourself. Having been in the system for well over 50 years I learnt along time ago to educate myself and look after myself. In all honesty no one can expect a GP to be up to date with everything and know everything as after all he is a general practitioner so knows a bit about most things but experts they are not.

    It takes a good GP and nurse to hold their hands up and say " I'm out of my depth so will refer you" Which obviously hadn't happened to OP's wife.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Kodiak's Avatar
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    In my experience, I am Diabetic for over 20 years and I take HUMULIN M3 Insulin twice a Day, I would go with the Hospital consultant. You do not want to be taking more Insulin than necessary as this can lead to having Hypo's, then to counter this you eat more, then you gain weight.

    So it is very important to get your level of Insulin correct so that you do not eat too much. Small meals and often are best so that you are never really hungry.

    If you can reduce the amount of insulin you take then it will be easier to lose weight if this is required. Correct amount of Insulin and well ballanced diet = Better health.
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    Senior Member gus607's Avatar
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    I was prescribed Humulin M3 Insulin during a recent hospital stay. 25 units am & 15 units pm. absolutely awful experience with daytime & nightime hypo's. My practice nurse noticed my odd behaviour on a visit & straight away reduced the insulin dose & then completely stopping the insulin with my GP's consent. BG levels perfect without any medication at all.This was all due to a clown of a hospital consultant who handed Insulin out like somone handing sweets out.
    My nurse warned me that Humulin m3 is one of the more potent insulins.
    After one nightime hypo episode my wife took a BG sample & my level was 2.5, not good at all, scary stuff.
    Call me Mike.

  9. #9
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    My nurse warned me that Humulin m3 is one of the more potent insulins.
    A
    All U100 insulin's are the same potency no idea where the nurse got that idea from.
    All insulin's have different duration times and some have more peaks and troughs than a mole hill. All mixed insulin's are the worst you could be prescribed as you have to eat the same carbs and at the time every day. The reason is it's cheaper than the others so being a good NHS employer the Dr or nurse will palm this stuff onto people and basically s*d the patients quality of life.

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