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Thread: Local Pub caught fire

  1. #1
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Local Pub caught fire

    I was driving home last night and had to pull over to let a ‘blue light’ fire engine pass to get to an emergency.

    On turning into my road there were two fire engines outside my local pub wjho had only just turned up.

    Smoke was billowing out of the roof and flames were just emerging from a chimney stack.

    As it emerged nobody was injured and even the landlady’s cat was rescued!!

    It appears a log burner in an upstairs flat was to blame. The pub downstairs will have smoke damage but it will be open for drinks only today.

    From an access point of view it’s wheelchair friendly. Most drinkers there at the time just left the pub and visited the nearest next pub!

    The new landlady has been offered help to clean the pub up by regulars in exchange for a few pints. Isn’t it surprising how a disaster pulls the local community together.

  2. #2
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Both my locals have had chimney fires in the last 10/15 years.

    It's a hazzard of having a cosy coal/log fire in the lounge bar, no matter how often or well the chimneys are swept you will still get the occasional chimney fire.
    Logs are a particular problem as the tar tends to coat the chimney lining and not get swept away the same as soot from coal does, if/when it does catch fire it also tends to burn longer than soot does.
    If you are burning logs then you need to have your chimney cleaned four or five times a year, as opposed to once or twice if burning coal.

    And don't forget that the chimney still needs cleaning once a year if you have a gas fire.

    As long as they are put out quickly enough there is little damage, but they can be extremely dangerous if not noticed for a while.
    (I've seen flames shooting 5/10 feet out of the chimney and the people inside were not even aware it was on fire).

    Back in the 40's/50's/60's when almost every home had a coal fire chimney blazes were commonplace, and the fire brigrades were expert at putting them out quickly.
    As central heating came in chimney fires became less common, at least in urban areas.

    Nowadays with the popularity of log burning stoves chimney fires are becomming fairly common again, and as said above the tar/resin from the logs can cause more problems than coal soot used to.

    http://www.stovesonline.co.uk/chimney-fires.html
    http://www.cheshirefire.gov.uk/publi...ey-fire-safety
    Last edited by nukecad; 12-03-2017 at 02:44 PM.
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  3. #3
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    My grandfather was a farm hand and had a tied cottage with coal fires. I used to stay for a week each school holidays. In what would have been the very late 60s or early 1970s I was staying there when the chimney caught fire. Nan just grabbed a couple of hessian sacks from the back porch (from what animal feed was delivered in), ran them under a tap, put the first on the fire and the second up the chimney. A mass of steam for a few minutes and both the actual room fire and the chimney fire were out before the fire brigade arrived. They checked it out and were gone in a matter of minutes.

  4. #4
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Yes people knew what to do in those days of common chimney fires, cut off the oxygen supply (wet sacks blocking the bottom of a narrow chimney) and it goes out.

    Of course with a wider chimney the draft of the blaze would just suck up the wet cloth and spit it out the top.
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