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Thread: universal credit and hospital

  1. #1
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    universal credit and hospital

    hello all

    i have a question about universal credit and hospital. can you still get uc if youve been in hospital over 6 months, cant really find much information about it,would be greatfull if someone new. i had a look on the disabilty rights website and it says upto 6 months just wandering whether it stops completly at six months or can you still get the basic rate after 6 months.

    regards

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by gazzmg View Post
    hello all

    i have a question about universal credit and hospital. can you still get uc if youve been in hospital over 6 months, cant really find much information about it,would be greatfull if someone new. i had a look on the disabilty rights website and it says upto 6 months just wandering whether it stops completly at six months or can you still get the basic rate after 6 months.

    regards
    From this link (not sure how old it is) there does not seem to be any information about what happens after 6 months.

    https://www.rethink.org/living-with-...rs/your-income

    I suggest that you give the Universal Credit helpline a call.

  3. #3
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    most benifits are only 1month , but i have no idea if UC is longer

  4. #4
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    As long as you are in hospital, as a single claimant, then your are automatically treated as LCW for Universal Credit, so you should be paid Universal Credit on LCW grounds - with no time limit.

    That's why you can't find anything about a time limit - there is no time limit for LCW/LCWRA.

    Anyone (single claimant) staying in hospital as a patient is automatically treated as LCW for Universal credit. (And could be LCWRA with cancer etc.)
    ADM chapter G2, section G2015
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...1586/admg2.pdf

    This is similar to the situation currently with ESA.
    (Although some ESA premiums are stopped after a time in hospital, because the entitlement to DLA/PIP/Carers Allowance stops).


    The 6 month 'limit' applies to joint claims for UC as a 'household'. (Also called a 'benefit unit').
    And it's more of a change of circumstances than a limit.
    UC payments continue after the 6 months, just in a different way.

    The rule that covers this is 'Temporary absence'. (from the household).

    ADM guidance Chapter E2, section E2030 defines Temporary absence as less than 6 months.
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...4527/adme2.pdf

    It goes on to give examples where a partner on a joint claim is hospitalised for more than 6 months

    Example 2 says:
    .........After 4 months Huw reports that Isobel’s treatment is progressing slower than expected and she will be in hospital for at least another 4 months. The DM decides Isobel is no longer a member of Huw’s benefit unit because it is now known that her total absence is expected to be in excess of 6 months, as they are no longer a joint claim couple the award is terminated. The termination is effective from the first day of the assessment period in which Huw reported Isobel’s slower progression. To continue receiving benefit Huw will have to make a new claim. Isobel will be entitled to UC as a single person without the need to submit a claim.
    Example 3 says the same thing but in that example 'Isobel' was always going to be in hospital for more than 6 months.

    (The example is also repeated in chapter E4 with different wording because that chapter is about unmarried partners living together as a married couple).

    It seems a bit of a strange way of doing it at first, but it is to do with the partner at home still being able to get housing element, child element, etc. if eligible. (Huw and Isobel have 3 children in those examples so they would be included on Huw's claim).

    The joint claim is ended, the partner not in hospital has to make a new claim as a single person (or as a household if there are kids/other adults in the 'benefit unit'), but the partner in hospital is automatically entitled to UC-LCW as a single person and doesn't need to make a new claim.


    PS. It took a bit of reading of the various ADM guides to find all that, but it's good to get it pinned down.
    Last edited by nukecad; 12-04-2017 at 04:02 PM.
    I'm intelligent enough to know that I don't know everything.
    But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.


    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  5. #5
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    Good find Nukecad!

    Couldn't find it myself.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukecad View Post
    As long as you are in hospital, as a single claimant, then your are automatically treated as LCW for Universal Credit, so you should be paid Universal Credit on LCW grounds - with no time limit.

    That's why you can't find anything about a time limit - there is no time limit for LCW/LCWRA.

    Anyone (single claimant) staying in hospital as a patient is automatically treated as LCW for Universal credit. (And could be LCWRA with cancer etc.)
    ADM chapter G2, section G2015
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...1586/admg2.pdf

    This is similar to the situation currently with ESA.
    (Although some ESA premiums are stopped after a time in hospital, because the entitlement to DLA/PIP/Carers Allowance stops).


    The 6 month 'limit' applies to joint claims for UC as a 'household'. (Also called a 'benefit unit').
    And it's more of a change of circumstances than a limit.
    UC payments continue after the 6 months, just in a different way.

    The rule that covers this is 'Temporary absence'. (from the household).

    ADM guidance Chapter E2, section E2030 defines Temporary absence as less than 6 months.
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...4527/adme2.pdf

    It goes on to give examples where a partner on a joint claim is hospitalised for more than 6 months

    Example 2 says:
    Example 3 says the same thing but in that example 'Isobel' was always going to be in hospital for more than 6 months.

    (The example is also repeated in chapter E4 with different wording because that chapter is about unmarried partners living together as a married couple).

    It seems a bit of a strange way of doing it at first, but it is to do with the partner at home still being able to get housing element, child element, etc. if eligible. (Huw and Isobel have 3 children in those examples so they would be included on Huw's claim).

    The joint claim is ended, the partner not in hospital has to make a new claim as a single person (or as a household if there are kids/other adults in the 'benefit unit'), but the partner in hospital is automatically entitled to UC-LCW as a single person and doesn't need to make a new claim.


    PS. It took a bit of reading of the various ADM guides to find all that, but it's good to get it pinned down.
    thanks that for the info its a great help

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by nukecad View Post
    As long as you are in hospital, as a single claimant, then your are automatically treated as LCW for Universal Credit, so you should be paid Universal Credit on LCW grounds - with no time limit.

    That's why you can't find anything about a time limit - there is no time limit for LCW/LCWRA.

    Anyone (single claimant) staying in hospital as a patient is automatically treated as LCW for Universal credit. (And could be LCWRA with cancer etc.)
    ADM chapter G2, section G2015
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...1586/admg2.pdf

    This is similar to the situation currently with ESA.
    (Although some ESA premiums are stopped after a time in hospital, because the entitlement to DLA/PIP/Carers Allowance stops).


    The 6 month 'limit' applies to joint claims for UC as a 'household'. (Also called a 'benefit unit').
    And it's more of a change of circumstances than a limit.
    UC payments continue after the 6 months, just in a different way.

    The rule that covers this is 'Temporary absence'. (from the household).

    ADM guidance Chapter E2, section E2030 defines Temporary absence as less than 6 months.
    https://www.gov.uk/government/upload...4527/adme2.pdf

    It goes on to give examples where a partner on a joint claim is hospitalised for more than 6 months

    Example 2 says:
    Example 3 says the same thing but in that example 'Isobel' was always going to be in hospital for more than 6 months.

    (The example is also repeated in chapter E4 with different wording because that chapter is about unmarried partners living together as a married couple).

    It seems a bit of a strange way of doing it at first, but it is to do with the partner at home still being able to get housing element, child element, etc. if eligible. (Huw and Isobel have 3 children in those examples so they would be included on Huw's claim).

    The joint claim is ended, the partner not in hospital has to make a new claim as a single person (or as a household if there are kids/other adults in the 'benefit unit'), but the partner in hospital is automatically entitled to UC-LCW as a single person and doesn't need to make a new claim.


    PS. It took a bit of reading of the various ADM guides to find all that, but it's good to get it pinned down.
    thank you extremely much for all the information. i've just joined here and i already found lots of info. I would really like to ask you... i see you know things much better than I do and I was wondering if you won't mind in case i'm going to ask you some questions in the future? like PM? thanks!

  8. #8
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    There is no PM facility on this particular forum.

    It's turned off to prevent disability/benefit trolls sending offensive messages to members.

    But ask away on the forum, we all have knowledge of different things so someone will help.

    You also get more answers that way than just PM'ing one person.

    It may take a few hours to get an answer, we all have our own conditions to cope with so log on when we can.
    I'm intelligent enough to know that I don't know everything.
    But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.


    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  9. #9
    Senior Member deebee's Avatar
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    Plus,the answer may benefit others

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