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Thread: Pain control without pain killers.

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by treborc View Post
    I sorry mate I seem to be keeping this rubbish active my mistake.
    I'm sure you'll learn in time that I like to take every opportunity possible to respond to unjust criticism.It's important for me to do so because I always post in my own name and therefore need to respond to any dishonest information posted about me. Sure people who use forum names that are not their own can say whatever lies they like with impunity but when you post in your own name you have to stick to the facts.
    In the same way it's important to defend the integrity of the researchers I link to.
    If you look at the link you see the lead authors are Ramsen CE AND Hibbeln JR These are scientists with a track record of valuable work.
    To dismiss their work as rubbish is ludicrous.

  2. #42
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    Study finds negativity tied to physical pain

    Study finds negativity tied to physical pain

    For placebo effects in medicine, seeing is believing.
    Abstract
    The gold standard for determining the efficacy of biomedical therapies is the detection of a significant difference between the therapeutic effects of an active pharmacological agent or procedure and a matched inert placebo in a randomized controlled trial.
    Detecting this difference has become a challenge for medicine, especially for outcomes that are based on patient self-rated scales.
    Yet factors that contribute to placebo responses have received scant attention.
    In this issue of Science Translational Medicine, Bingel et al. report on an example of how noninvasive whole-brain imaging contributes to our understanding of brain-based placebo effects.
    Here we highlight ways in which neuroimaging is catalyzing a revolution in society's perspective of placebo effects by providing a compelling visualization of how brain activities that reflect a person's thoughts, feelings, and past experiences can enhance or antagonize his or her response to a medical treatment.
    The effect of treatment expectation on drug efficacy: imaging the analgesic benefit of the opioid remifentanil
    Abstract
    Evidence from behavioral and self-reported data suggests that the patients' beliefs and expectations can shape both therapeutic and adverse effects of any given drug.
    We investigated how divergent expectancies alter the analgesic efficacy of a potent opioid in healthy volunteers by using brain imaging.
    The effect of a fixed concentration of the μ-opioid agonist remifentanil on constant heat pain was assessed under three experimental conditions using a within-subject design:
    1) with no expectation of analgesia,
    2)with expectancy of a positive analgesic effect, and
    3) with negative expectancy of analgesia (that is, expectation of hyperalgesia or exacerbation of pain).
    We used functional magnetic resonance imaging to record brain activity to corroborate the effects of expectations on the analgesic efficacy of the opioid and to elucidate the underlying neural mechanisms.
    Positive treatment expectancy substantially enhanced (doubled) the analgesic benefit of remifentanil.
    In contrast, negative treatment expectancy abolished remifentanil analgesia.
    These subjective effects were substantiated by significant changes in the neural activity in brain regions involved with the coding of pain intensity.
    The positive expectancy effects were associated with activity in the endogenous pain modulatory system, and the negative expectancy effects with activity in the hippocampus.
    On the basis of subjective and objective evidence, we contend that an individual's expectation of a drug's effect critically influences its therapeutic efficacy and that regulatory brain mechanisms differ as a function of expectancy.
    We propose that it may be necessary to integrate patients' beliefs and expectations into drug treatment regimes alongside traditional considerations in order to optimize treatment outcomes.
    Your attitude and expectations of any medical intervention depend on your preconceptions about that treatment plan.

    This is why I think it's important that people STUDY the science BEFORE they dismiss the ideas I've talked about and provided links to.

    When you understand the basics of the way inflammation (or the inflammatory response) is creating the pain, then you will better understand how it is that building up your arsenal of anti inflammatory reserves can, over time, reduce the amount of pain you experience.

    If you approach any medical intervention with the expectation that it will be a waste of time and probably a waste of money you are doomed from the start and may as well not bother because that very negativity will have added to your inflammatory status and will itself be abolishing the potential for optimum results.

    It doesn't make any difference to me because I know improving my anti inflammatory status has reduced my pain levels such that I am only aware of pain when I've not paced my activities and done too much. But because I know I'm basically in control of that situation I'm absolutely confident that if I keep on doing what I've been doing the pain will decrease.

    If you start with negative thoughts you will end up with negative results.

  3. #43
    Senior Member andypandy's Avatar
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    I am pleased for you Ted and glad that it works for you, but surely everyone is entitled to do what works best for them. You are a very intelligent man and must see that.

    Do you know how many people you have "converted" to your way of thinking ?

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by andypandy View Post
    I am pleased for you Ted and glad that it works for you, but surely everyone is entitled to do what works best for them.
    But it is important that we offer positive evidence based information to help others Creating a climate of hostility where no constructive or helpful up to date science based information can be provided must be counter-productive.

    It is perfectly reasonable to expect those not interested in topics don't maliciously disrupt threads they have no interest in.

    We should not be put in a position where only the mindless bullies, who haven't sufficient sense to follow let alone read the information at the links provided, are permitted to wreck any thread they choose to take exception to.
    Of course a reasoned and articulate debate over differences of opinion is helpful in clarifying understandings but the name calling and downright dishonesty should not be acceptable in a civilised forum.
    "You are a very intelligent person and must see that."

    If people are managing their pain successfully then I doubt they would be interested in this thread.
    The only people interested in Pain control without pain killers. are people who may be thinking it better to reduce/ limit/slow the escalating amounts of prescribed medication they are now using.
    I was going through pain medications at an ever faster rate.
    I was panicking that if I exhausted the range of options available too soon there would be nothing available for my old age.
    When you've got to the point there are no pain medications available that don't carry with them huge adverse risks then it's time to adopt a different strategy.
    It's reasonable to predict there are others here who are going through what I went through and may benefit from my successful experience.

    It was much the same with the antibiotics for UTI. If you get to the point there are no known antibiotics available to deal with the antibiotic resistant strain of e coli in your system, it's time to think again. If you are aware of anyone else self-catheterising 5 times daily but remaining UTI /antibiotic free then it would be interesting to hear their experience.
    Surely this forum is about sharing successful strategies for living with disability.
    Reducing the amount/frequency of prescription drugs is surely something we should all encourage.


    Do you know how many people you have "converted" to your way of thinking ?
    I have no idea how many people read my posts and change their way of life.
    When we buy a new car we are given details of the appropriate pressures and fluid levels.
    Keeping our car at the makers original specifications ensures optimum performance.
    Human don't come with a service manual but keeping our diet/mineral/vitamin intakes as near as possible to those human DNA evolved to cope with is the best we can do.
    So adopting a 25(OH)D level that approximates with the level human bodies naturally maintain equilibrium and at which human breast milk is vitamin D replete seems common sense. Similarly If we can see
    Changes in Omega-6 and Omega-3 Fat Consumption over the Last Century(WholeHealthSource) coincide with huge increases in obesity/diabetes/cancer/Alzheimer's rates, we have to reconsider if it's the recent changes in our diet/lifestyles that is driving these increases in chronic diseases of Western Civilization.

    Trying to restore the natural levels of vitamin D, melatonin, omega 3, magnesium human DNA evolved over hundreds of thousands of years to function best with should not be regarded as in any way extreme or unsafe. Most of the damaging changes that give rise to current disease rates have occurred over my lifetime so it's not that difficult to correct those changes.

    If you want to understand more about the ways Cooling Inflammation can help improve health Dr Art Ayers is reasonably easy to understand. but it may be worth starting at the earliest entries where he outlines his anti inflammation diet ideas.

  5. #45
    Senior Member andypandy's Avatar
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    Ok Ted, yes you may be right on some points. I was rudely awoken this morning at 9.30 by 2 paramedics because I had accidentally overdosed on Oramorph at 5am this morning. I suppose if I wasn't using painkillers for pain it wouldn't have happened !

    I hadn't taken Oramorph for a couple of months because it actually keeps me awake so I try to avoid it, but this morning I was in a lot more pain so without thinking took my "usual" dose of 10mls, unfortunately it was my "usual" dose 3 months ago. So when my carer came in this morning she could not rouse me - whoops !

    Yes, I know I hate to say it - you might have something here ha ha, although its not going to stop me from taking everything I am already on, but thought I would let you know what happened this morning.

    Please don't blind me with science if you answer, as I aren't very clever you know !!!!!

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