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keeper29
06-18-2015, 01:19 PM
I have finally accepted that I need more help with my mobility, I am looking at getting a mobility scooter through the motability scheme.
Can anyone recommend a scooter for me, I need it to be as light as possible, but sturdy so I feel safe.
I have looked at a bootmaster elite if any one has heard of it
Thanks ;)

worcshomemum
06-18-2015, 02:18 PM
I have finally accepted that I need more help with my mobility, I am looking at getting a mobility scooter through the motability scheme.
Can anyone recommend a scooter for me, I need it to be as light as possible, but sturdy so I feel safe.
I have looked at a bootmaster elite if any one has heard of it
Thanks ;)

There is a danger in taking advice and ending up with a scooter that isn't right for you. The only way to be sure is to trawl the local dealers and see what they have to offer. What we found was that very often a dealer is only too happy to sell just what they have in stock regardless of your needs. Ask about a different manufacturer and you get all kinds of responses, and it is ever so hard to walk away from them.

I would also hesitate to say that I would also steer clear of spending with Motobility unless that is the really what you want to do. A 0% credit card will give you up to 23 months to pay it back and you own the vehicle for yourself. You will be better to buy an insurance policy for any accidents or damage suffered by the scooter, some companies offer quite good policies. With Motobility, once the term of the lease is up you walk away empty handed, if you buy on a 0% credit card you can at least sell the scooter or keep it until it runs into the ground.

Take time to look at things like handle bars and braked too, when I tried one I returned to the showroom and crashed into the desk, with the boss sitting on the other side of it...

Another point, if you intend to go shopping with it please be aware that a lot of shops won't allow you in with it, so unless you are able to potter around unaided you just might be better with a smaller electric wheelchair.

Apologies if I sound negative, we have spent a lot of money on what seemed like the right piece of equipment and most of it is not being used, or sold at considerable loss.

keeper29
06-18-2015, 02:39 PM
Thanks for your reply and for your insightful advice. I was thinking about buying one but was worried about breakdown and being stuck somewhere!! They really pushed this at the shop so I think I was spooked. I cannot walk far at all and was hoping a small scooter might be Ok in shops and cafes but that's something else to check :-) I have a nhs wheelchair, I think I'll have to take my time and try to get this right

worcshomemum
06-18-2015, 02:57 PM
Hmm, sounds like you have been pressured like I was, it's not nice and these suppliers/showrooms know you are vulnerable in some way and take advantage by scaring. There are some insurance policies that are better than others, where you pay a bit more premium and they will cover you for rescue and repairs, so don't be fobbed off.
I know when we started looking into aids for my disability someone said as soon as you say disabled the price goes right up.

Take a look at the options apart from a scooter, there are all kinds of electric chairs, power add-ons (some you can pay a bit more(!) and have as attendant controlled too) and even levels, all depending on what strength you have left.

If you belong to a local group of any kind that might be a good place to talk through options and maybe try out what other members have bought.

beau
06-18-2015, 03:02 PM
If your area has a Shopmobility, some areas do recovery and repairs. Worth looking into instead of insurance for breakdown as you only pay if you use the service. As it is a charity the prices are very reasonable. Worth looking into as scooters tend to be very reliable.
It is recommended that you have 3rd party insurance though. I found the cheapest way to do this is to have goods away from home and legal protection on my home contents insurance. Cost me an extra £15 for the year. Not all insurances companies will do that though.

keeper29
06-18-2015, 03:07 PM
We have got shopmobility in town and I'll phone the home insurance and check what they can do, Thankyou I'm glad I asked, I'm getting lots of useful ideas

beau
06-18-2015, 03:32 PM
Just be aware that not all area's Shopmobility do this breakdown, recovery and repair service. Contact them to check.
The once I have had to use ours was after a puncture, they collected my scooter and loaned me one for the duration mine was off the road at no cost to myself for the loan of it. I did have to pay for the repair though.

reddivine
06-18-2015, 04:25 PM
Try using various models with Shopmobility to get an idea wot works and wot doesn't and shop around.....look or even hire before you buy.
As advised above you need to be sure its what you need.
As for shops....well with big supermarkets your usually allright, smaller shops, you will have to leave it outside. If thats not an option, hmm may have to think again

Fliss
06-18-2015, 06:09 PM
This guide maybe helpful, it explains the different sizes/classes of scooters, gives the pros and cons of each type, and I think the list of things to consider will be useful for you to decide what you need. There is a bewildering choice!

http://www.rica.org.uk/content/scooters-and-powered-wheelchairs

be wary of sales staff in showrooms, many of them work on commission and they are usually very keen to sell you breakdown cover, service, etc - this is often expensive. Some shops do service/repairs on site - I know of one shop like this and they're really helpful and honest. My local shopmobility also does basic repairs and new batteries. I pay for a service every year or so (can't remember how much, but it's OK) and any repairs/replacement parts have never been expensive.

I've used a scooter for 5 years, it has travelled for miles and been very very reliable - I'm always reluctant to recommend anything, but it is a small "boot" scooter Pride Go Go. I know a few people who have had Pride scooters, and they seem reliable. I've never had breakdown cover for it, but do have insurance, and I'd recommend that anyone does.

Very much agree to try Shopmobility models to get a feel for using one - in my experience they tend to be bigger than the boot size ones. It might be worth hiring one for a week or so to try a particular model in different situations. I also have a wheelchair (2 to be honest!) and there are some indoor situations where you will find your wheelchair easier - restaurants, etc. but I do use my small scooter in some indoor situations, it's not particularly wide or long, but it needs a much larger turning circle than a chair. It's fine in bigger shops, supermarkets, etc but I don't often attempt small shops - they often have a step anyway. It is ok in most cafés as long as you pick your table carefully so you can get out. I've never attempted to go in somewhere and been told I can't, presumably because it's small.

Good luck!

keeper29
06-18-2015, 06:48 PM
Thanks Fliss, that guide was really useful, I think I'm going to buy a small scooter, sort out insurance and breakdown. I'll keep my wheelchair and still use that when I want to go out to little shops and cafes. The scooter I think will be good for visiting friends, picking kids up from school etc. It'll be good to have a choice of transportation ;-)

Fliss
06-18-2015, 07:10 PM
Glad it helped! If you're looking at small scooters remember that slightly bigger wheels make slightly higher kerbs a bit easier.

beau
06-18-2015, 07:35 PM
Plus don't forget that slightly bigger wheels add to stability.
If I were you I would discount the 3 wheel models, again because of stability.