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Thread: Disabled and not ready for a wheelchair - advice

  1. #11
    Lippy and a beard - now that would get heads turning

    I think you'll find that there are a lot more people out there in scooters and wheelchairs than you think and tbh I barely earn a second glance most of the time. I think the prevalence of low cost scooters and power chairs has allowed more disabled people to get out and about. I notice so many more disabled people now than I did when I first started using a wheelchair 25 years ago.

  2. #12
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    ...it was great aside from a few oldies staring!
    And probably thinking to themselves: 'that would make my life easier, but I'm not sure. Should I get one of those yet or not?'.

    Similar to the thinking process you have just gone through yourself.
    I don't know everything. - But I'm good at searching for, and finding, stuff.

    Migration from ESA to Universal Credit- Click here for information.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Hi Jay, so you’re a young disabled person who will soon have your own self-drive vehicle. To increase your independence when leaving the car you’re thinking of getting an ‘active manual wheelchair that you can dismantle and put in the passenger from seat – seems reasonable to me.

    It’s obviously not just about the wheelchair! As a young person you don’t really want to be associated with being ‘branded’ a disabled ‘wheelchair user’ as that’s not good for your image!

    So forget the heavy NHS wheelchair options – what you need is something that’s lightweight, well made and stylish so if pe5ople look at you it’s be5cause you’re looking cool!

    Check out the ‘Quickie’ range. These aren’t cheap – the Xenon starts off about £2000 and the more you ‘pimp your ride’ the more costly.
    http://www.sunrisemedical.co.uk/whee...ht-wheelchairs]

    You can get drop down handgrips or none at all. I’d suggest you invest in some sporty quick release wheels – get 12 black spokes – they don’t rust.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/24-Spinergy-...539c9.69246453


    If your previous wheelchair was from the NHS’s wheelchair service in the last 5 years you might not be eligible for the ‘wheelchair voucher scheme’.

    If cash is a problem you might try applying for a grant towards buying your wheelchair.

    Grants
    http://www.disability-grants.org/gra...hairs-two.html

    Ability Matters
    Your best bet is to visit an assessment unit that sell the type of chair you’re interested in. They will organize a medical person to meet you and custom measure you for a bespoke wheelchair. I’d recommend these people.
    http://www.abilitymatters.co.uk/Locations

    Cushions
    In order for you to feel comfortable I’d recommend you look into ‘Jay cushions’ – now we see how you choose your screen name!
    http://www.sunrisemedical.co.uk/seat.../xtreme-active

  4. #14
    a few looks for something other than my walking may not be a bad idea! Ha, not sure on the shade though?! :P

    @lighttouch
    I've been looking into the Quickie brand from Sunrise medical for about a month; at the moment the cost would be too much to find upfront however there is a Kushall K4 series in a next to new condition from someone local to me for a quarter of the price, I've contacted them for a viewing to make sure measurement wise it would be suitable. Thanks for all the extra resources, I will check them out!

    @Rasy
    I also didn't know lightweight wheelchairs can be issued by the NHS - thinking I should do a little more research.

    If the K4 is suitable I wouldn't mind footing the bill as its a small price to pay for independence.

    @nuke
    No doubt I was probably on the 'defensive' side a little as it was my first real time out using a wheelchair, I didn't mean to cause any offence, it was just something I noticed.

  5. #15
    Hey there. I know how you feel. I'm female, 31 and very image conscious. I'm also finally managing to lose the weight I put on having my young boys and so enjoy my appearance more, and just don't feel ready for a mobility scooter or wheelchair. I also now find the pain of walking just 10m enough to put me off going out, but this is a no can do with two young boys! And I want to take them to the park, I want to take them down the seaside. But using a mobility scooter solo means going the whole hog; a huge change in your way of life. The vehicle to put it in, the ramp or hoist, the mindset.... I'm just not there yet. For full days out, sure. But not for just "nipping about".

    So my solution? I'm getting something like this:
    http://www.scootercity.co.uk/micro-e...o-scooter.html

    I'm pairing it with one of those ramps you can use so that large dogs can easily get in and out of car boots, and voila! A more lightweight answer to those shorter journeys. I won't feel so "disabled" sitting on it and hopefully it will also wean me onto feeling more comfortable with the real deal.

    Jen
    Last edited by NexivRed; 04-21-2016 at 08:53 PM.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by NexivRed View Post
    Hey there. I know how you feel. I'm female, 31 and very image conscious. I'm also finally managing to lose the weight I put on having my young boys and so enjoy my appearance more, and just don't feel ready for a mobility scooter or wheelchair. I also now find the pain of walking just 10m enough to put me off going out, but this is a no can do with two young boys! And I want to take them to the park, I want to take them down the seaside. But using a mobility scooter solo means going the whole hog; a huge change in your way of life. The vehicle to put it in, the ramp or hoist, the mindset.... I'm just not there yet. For full days out, sure. But not for just "nipping about".

    So my solution? I'm getting something like this:
    http://www.scootercity.co.uk/micro-e...o-scooter.html

    I'm pairing it with one of those ramps you can use so that large dogs can easily get in and out of car boots, and voila! A more lightweight answer to those shorter journeys. I won't feel so "disabled" sitting on it and hopefully it will also wean me onto feeling more comfortable with the real deal.

    Jen
    Hi Jen, it looks like a good option for you particularly with your young sons and remaining as active with them as possible. You will look as cool as them on one of those too ha. You'll have to let us know how you get on if you go down that route. but I agree, a great tool to help 'ease' you into the real deal!

    I too, have avoided going out as its too much struggle but I have used my manual chair a few times over the last 3 weeks and managed to feel way less self conscious than I did before. And in a lot less pain!

    When I was diagnosed 5 years ago, the Dr said: 'you can't change the hand you're dealt in life but you can change the way you play the game'. Recently those words have struck a cord with me and hopefully they will spur others on this forum to make a change and continue pushing through the hard times. In the end, we're only here once!

    Jay

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Jayl94 View Post
    Hi Jen, it looks like a good option for you particularly with your young sons and remaining as active with them as possible. You will look as cool as them on one of those too ha. You'll have to let us know how you get on if you go down that route. but I agree, a great tool to help 'ease' you into the real deal!

    I too, have avoided going out as its too much struggle but I have used my manual chair a few times over the last 3 weeks and managed to feel way less self conscious than I did before. And in a lot less pain!

    When I was diagnosed 5 years ago, the Dr said: 'you can't change the hand you're dealt in life but you can change the way you play the game'. Recently those words have struck a cord with me and hopefully they will spur others on this forum to make a change and continue pushing through the hard times. In the end, we're only here once!

    Jay
    I really like what your doctor said there...I've had glimmers of feeling like that. Just accepting my lot and embracing it, like when I decided to stop feeling embarrassed about having a mental illness and chose to get my (albeit small) suicide survivor tattoo.
    And I had a bit last night too, when I chose a set of chic looking black crutches off eBay, along with a backpack to use with them and my scooter as my nice handbag wouldn't be any good. I just thought "to hell with it! This is my life so let's do this!"


    These aren't the decisions or choices or purchases I thought I'd be making in my life. But I think as soon as we let go of the alternate reality in which we don't have our conditions, we can better embrace life and enjoy it to its fullest *despite* our conditions.

    And I bought my scooter just a moment ago and cannot wait to get it and get back out there next week
    Look forward to seeing how you get on with choosing your new lease of life!

  8. #18
    "But I think as soon as we let go of the alternate reality in which we don't have our conditions, we can better embrace life and enjoy it to its fullest *despite* our conditions." - you hit the nail on the head there.

    I bet you can't wait for your scooter to arrive, I wish you all the best with it!

    You have a great spirit - very uplifting.
    Yesterday I took another bad fall just trying to get back into the house from the car, so it's quite refreshing to come on here and see the comments.

    Have fun with your scooter!!

  9. #19
    Not a wheelchair user myself but my daughter is.
    The wheelchairs - well ginormous scooters really are the ones which catch my eye.
    Some are like small cars - too big for pavements and in shopping centres i think.
    However they seem to be coming increasingly popular in our area, so I suppose they must have something good about them!!
    Sea Queen

  10. #20
    I just wanted to say I completely understand where you are coming from.

    I've just turned 30, I can be image conscious, as in if I am going somewhere in particular I do try to make the effort. I also look a lot younger then my age.

    I would benefit from a wheelchair or mobilty scooter, I know this as I just have too much pain to walk and after I am left in so much pain for days. But something inside me still says no to them, even though I know it would help me so much and I could most likely do so much more, I just resist all the time.


    Also, and this is going to sound so silly, but here goes, I kind of feel as I physically can walk, even though it hurts too much, that I just don't feel 'worthy' of a chair/scooter. It may sound so silly, but that's how my mind works!

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