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Thread: Benefits of a lodger

  1. #21
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    The question is do I want to take it further. From a romantic side yes. From a practical side no, She has nothing and I have everything to lose if I take it further and we eventually split after two years if she is considered to be a common law wife.

    Things would be so much easy if we both had nothing - but if that was the case we would never have met!

    Decisions, decisions - what's your view.

  2. #22
    None of my business but reminds me of the old saying....who said romance is dead

  3. #23
    Having bothered to read the last few pages as im bored. I really dont see what you have to worry about, do you think you will split and she will get half of everything? if so thats not how it goes, she has to have contributed to whatever you have. Having read about her you sound lucky to have her, maybe she needs to think twice?

  4. #24
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Oh dear, my lovely lodger is moving on.
    She’s given notice to say she’ll be moving out early February.

    Is the reason disability related. Well perhaps, I had a very nasty fall in the kitchen and knocked myself out. When I came around I could see, hear but not speak or move. My lodger happenened to be in the kitchen at the time - it really shocked her. She called an ambulance and a ‘first response paramedic turned up in under 5 minutes. I had a spell at A&E and returned home none the worst for the bump.

    At home I tried to make light of the situation but my lodger had been in tears and shook.

    As she said, she didn’t sign up for this responsibly and doesn’t want to return home one day to find me deceased.

    I’m used to trips and falls so it doesn’t make any lasting impressions on my.

    I think my lodger is very squeamish and doesn’t want to be in that horrific possition again so I can’t blame her.

  5. #25
    I’m not sure I’d class it as squeamish, but the vast majority of non disabled people don’t really have a clue, confronted with the results of some disabilities could be very shocking.

    It’s another sad consequence of disabilities. Glad you’re better

  6. #26
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Well my lodger moved out on the 9 February so it gave me the opportunity to spruce my bedroom up. I'm still waiting for a carpet to be delivered this coming week and it's been decorated too.

    The interesting thing is my Philopean cleaner, Teresa, has asked if she could take the small bedroom and she'll do all the cleaning etc for free with a reduced rent. She knows me quite well as she cleans once a fortnight for the last yer.

    I've said fine so she moves in mid March. And so the next adventure begins . . .

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    Well my lodger moved out on the 9 February so it gave me the opportunity to spruce my bedroom up. I'm still waiting for a carpet to be delivered this coming week and it's been decorated too.

    The interesting thing is my Philopean cleaner, Teresa, has asked if she could take the small bedroom and she'll do all the cleaning etc for free with a reduced rent. She knows me quite well as she cleans once a fortnight for the last yer.


    I've said fine so she moves in mid March. And so the next adventure begins . . .
    O dear LT, just read this. Have to agree with Robcarer, its not squeamish of her. I have had a life time of being epileptic, falls, knocking self out, and visits to A&E. My son has been a STAR. But for a person who isn't family, who has no responsibility for you, and doesn't want it.
    I'd counsel caution with the new lodger and try and seperate the landlord/ employer role. You've done the lodger/landlord thing before so guess you have that sorted, but will giving her reduced rent for services affect her (possible) benefits? Is she then seen as a live in carer by the DWP as she does cleaning?

  8. #28
    Don't forget that you have to check that she is legally allowed to live in the UK.

    https://www.spareroom.co.uk/content/...-for-landlords

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Lighttouch View Post
    And so the next adventure begins . . .
    As Del boy once said "Oh you tart"

    Gud luck

  10. #30
    Senior Member Lighttouch's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by reddivine View Post
    O dear LT, just read this. Have to agree with Robcarer, its not squeamish of her. I have had a life time of being epileptic, falls, knocking self out, and visits to A&E. My son has been a STAR. But for a person who isn't family, who has no responsibility for you, and doesn't want it.
    I'd counsel caution with the new lodger and try and seperate the landlord/ employer role. You've done the lodger/landlord thing before so guess you have that sorted, but will giving her reduced rent for services affect her (possible) benefits? Is she then seen as a live in carer by the DWP as she does cleaning?
    I've had my bedroom decorated and a new carpet put down - looks fresher! Room is still a bit of a tip with drawers on the bed waiting for me to look and chuck stuff out.

    My cleaner comes over this Monday if the pavements are safe. I've asked her to bring her passport and any Home Office paperwork. She told me that she came over on a student's Visa - she's mid forties. She doesn't claim any benefits and tends to work 7 days a week cleaning different homes. She's helping to fund her daughter's education at a University in the Philippines.

    Let's hope she only wants to stay a few months and can go back after the family's relatives leave. I wouldn't take a deposit and charge half rent as she can't get HB. If she can't produce documents to say she has the right to rent - I'll come back here to find out the next step.

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