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Thread: Doctors Letter (ESA)

  1. #1

    Doctors Letter (ESA)

    I have an esa assessment coming up in October,so i went to my GP to ask for a letter regarding my health problems,she told me it would cost £30, it has been a long time since i went to my GP,but she wrote out a letter quite a while back and i was not charged.
    And i asked for a copy of a letter from a pain management doctor and she couldn't find it on the system,so a pretty pointless appointment,i don't want to fork out 30 quid for my own medical history.

    I also sent a couple of medical documents in with my ES50 form,will the medical assessor have those documents on the day of my assessment.

    Cheers.

  2. #2
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    They are allowed to charge for creating a new letter.

    However there is a different free route that you can use, it doesn't give you a new supporting letter but does give you stuff you may be able to use (including the PM letter she couldn't find).
    These could be handy if you later have to MR/appeal.

    Make a 'Right of Access' request (also call a Subject Access Request) to the practice/surgery for a full copy of your records (or just for the parts that you want).
    They must supply these within 30 days of receiving your request, by law they should not charge for supplying them. (Although some still try to charge).
    Being medical information they can refuse to give something that may be harmful to your health if you saw it.
    See this which also contains a template letter: https://ico.org.uk/your-data-matters...ght-of-access/

    The assessor should have a copy of everything that you sent with the ESA50.
    Last edited by nukecad; 10-01-2019 at 01:15 PM.
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  3. #3
    That's very helpful,thank you,i did send a copy of the pain management letter in with my ES50,but have misplaced the original copy,hence the GP visit,but it's good to know that the assessor will have the copy i sent,thanks again.

    Stephen.

  4. #4
    Ive never sent a letter from my Doc. Every time I have asked him he says there is no need because the DWP will write and ask him anyway dont know if thats correct but Ive had no real problems with it anyway plus it saves 30 quid!

  5. #5
    Senior Member RaspberryRipple's Avatar
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    It’s up to you whether you decide it’s worth paying. Personally I’m very glad I did! I ended up having a paper based assessment and got put straight into the support group. However, just because you have the letter it’s not a guarantee of no medical.

  6. #6
    Dr's letters are often pointless and regularly do not help at all. A Dr is not allowed to write what you tell them, they can only write what they know is true and have seen for themselves. So if you need help to do things, the Dr cannot write about it unless they have seen you do it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member RaspberryRipple's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by abcd69 View Post
    Dr's letters are often pointless and regularly do not help at all. A Dr is not allowed to write what you tell them, they can only write what they know is true and have seen for themselves. So if you need help to do things, the Dr cannot write about it unless they have seen you do it.
    Not necessarily. Since my last post I’ve received a letter stating my PIP will also be a paper based assessment. I sent in evidence and although it was a hassle getting it, it was well worth the extra effort.

  8. #8
    Personally I've seen doctors letters to be somewhat pointless even they I have no doubt they can help depending on someones health problems.

    At my first assessment the assessment staff said they've read a supporting letter my doctor sent them (when they requested evidence from my GP) who has backed up everything I said about my health problems and so the assessment was more of a chat than an assessment. They seemed concerned for my health and were making suggestions about how I can get more help than I was currently getting. I was put in the SG.

    At my second assessment I hadn't been to my GP in over 2 years. This is because the NHS have deprived me of essential help and have acted borderline negligently. I've got a history of self harm with meds and due to living alone and being isolated I have to manage the meds by myself which is very dangerous for me. Regardless of this, the NHS have pressured me to go back on meds twice, which I did and ended up in hospital again both times. 2 years ago they were pressuring me to go on meds again and when I raised concerns again, they accused me of making excuses and not wanting to get better. It's a massive factor in me totally disengaging with the NHS and refusing to ever see another member of staff again.

    Oops.... Sorry I made that a bit long.... but anyway. At my second assessment they said they haven't had any medical evidence from my GP even though they asked (which no doubt is because I haven't been to my GP since early 2017). It didn't affect the outcome though as they saw for themselves I'm not fit enough to work and I was left in the SG for another 18 months.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by abcd69 View Post
    Dr's letters are often pointless and regularly do not help at all. A Dr is not allowed to write what you tell them, they can only write what they know is true and have seen for themselves. So if you need help to do things, the Dr cannot write about it unless they have seen you do it.
    Not for me I didn't ask my doctor to write anything he wrote what he wanted and it got me esa I know it did because the decision maker wrote it in his report.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by abcd69 View Post
    Dr's letters are often pointless and regularly do not help at all. A Dr is not allowed to write what you tell them, they can only write what they know is true and have seen for themselves. So if you need help to do things, the Dr cannot write about it unless they have seen you do it.
    I dont quite agree with this.

    They can offer an informed opinion based on their own observations, reports from other HCP's and reports from carers.

    I am not necessarily disagreeing with the statement that the majority of the time GP letters are not very useful. but I disagree with the part on the limitation of what they can write.

    For PIP I asked if my doctor could help me, she responded by telling me to contact a specific charity and for them to tell her what is required as evidence. They then sent me a form which was similar to the forms that assessors fill in. Basically the GP fills in this form, ticks what they think is the descriptor based on their medical opinion and fill in the box below with justification.

    My GP took a while (well over a month) but she filled it in, and the amount written probably amounted to a bout 150-200 lines in total.

    My report from the AP, referenced my GP evidence multiple times when justifying scoring descriptors.

    Also my GP didnt charge me for this either, the receptionist was surprised, and had to double check was free when it was collected.

    For me tho. I had a very close relationship with my GP, I seen or rang her very regularly, a lot of my day to day problems were talked about with her, my very first appointment with her I was admitted to hospital, she was my GP when I had carers, she was the only GP I ever made appointments with, and she consulted with my occupational therapist. She knew a lot about my conditions and day to day restrictions. Was clearly best placed to provide supporting evidence.

    I do cringe when I see people telling others to not even bother to contact their, GP, I accept it can be a fruitless exercise but it shouldnt be assumed it will be.

    I highly recommend when people make GP appointments to always see the same doctor, so there is that consistency and the GP learning about your health. If a GP doesnt believe in what you telling them, then dont be afraid to use a different one until you find one that does, when you do find a good GP, keep in regular touch with them.
    Last edited by worried33; 10-24-2019 at 03:41 PM.

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