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Thread: Uc50 questionnaire - moving around

  1. #1

    Uc50 questionnaire - moving around

    I'm quite confused about what to answer for the moving around question on the UC50 work capability questionnaire.
    The questions asks how far I can move safely and repeatedly without having to stop.
    The options show the shortest distance as 50 metres.
    I can not take one step without being in pain so do I tick 'it varies' and explain this?

  2. #2
    Whenever I fill in these forms I would use whichever most described my condition although it is very confusing when something doesn't seem to fit with what you experience and you feel like you are second guessing what to put. It would sound to me as though "it varies" would most accurately fit what you need to say, however, my own advice is to always write a short paragraph for each and every question anyway even if it appears to be straightforward. For myself I wrote "see attached sheet" and had someone type up what I would say to them about that particular activity so the person performing the assessment has no ambiguity about my condition or its affects on my day to day life, even if this means they end up with a form returned to them where the attached paperwork is larger than the form itself. This can be particularly useful if you have a disability which hasn't changed over the course of the years and you don't have copious recent medical notes because, whilst ill, have no course to bother a doctor about because treatment is managed.

    The best principle I personally go by is to assume the person reading it has no idea what your disability is. Even if you have no legs, assume the person reading it doesn't know what having no legs means, as though it is completely an alien subject to them and they can't even begin to imagine it. If anything does go awry and you end up in a tribunal (hopefully not) then they look ridiculous asking how far you can walk when it's been explained to them in great detail at every opportunity through the assessment, it's unlikely that they can bring up the chestnut that you never discussed it and that it's all new to them if it's in black and white.

  3. #3
    Additional:

    Although ensure that each question is numbered on each attached sheet. I wouldnt just write a big paragraph to try and cover everything as they probably wouldnt accept it. However, don't be afraid to repeat your answers in other questions.

    These are just my own tips.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by obsidianeclipse View Post
    Whenever I fill in these forms I would use whichever most described my condition although it is very confusing when something doesn't seem to fit with what you experience and you feel like you are second guessing what to put. It would sound to me as though "it varies" would most accurately fit what you need to say, however, my own advice is to always write a short paragraph for each and every question anyway even if it appears to be straightforward. For myself I wrote "see attached sheet" and had someone type up what I would say to them about that particular activity so the person performing the assessment has no ambiguity about my condition or its affects on my day to day life, even if this means they end up with a form returned to them where the attached paperwork is larger than the form itself. This can be particularly useful if you have a disability which hasn't changed over the course of the years and you don't have copious recent medical notes because, whilst ill, have no course to bother a doctor about because treatment is managed.

    The best principle I personally go by is to assume the person reading it has no idea what your disability is. Even if you have no legs, assume the person reading it doesn't know what having no legs means, as though it is completely an alien subject to them and they can't even begin to imagine it. If anything does go awry and you end up in a tribunal (hopefully not) then they look ridiculous asking how far you can walk when it's been explained to them in great detail at every opportunity through the assessment, it's unlikely that they can bring up the chestnut that you never discussed it and that it's all new to them if it's in black and white.
    The trouble is that the HCP will consider if you are able to use a manual wheelchair.

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