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Thread: Flu Vaccine Letter For People Who Were Shielding

  1. #11
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    Is that the one where you have to keep it in the fridge until posting it?

    Probably the same as us what a load of....

    Yes there will always be some people who don't want to inject & some that won't go near an injection for love nor money. Had a practise nurse years ago she gave injections out every day but they had to nearly hold her down to get here flu jab each year!.

    Did you hear about one of the covid vaccines that it's in powder form & the thing that gives it to you pushes the powder through your arm with air? I can't see that one working but they say it is

  2. #12
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    Been having stool samples for years now. They have changed, initially you had to sample over 3 days and smear it onto the relevant spot on a card. Much easier now.

  3. #13
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by StarBright View Post
    Is that the one where you have to keep it in the fridge until posting it?
    Don't know about that, I've only got the letter and the testing kit should come next week.

    I wouldn't realy see the point of keeping it in the fridge and then putting it into a postbox that's probably in direct sunlight?
    With the post office like it is it's probably going to take a few days unrefrigerated to get to the NHS. (If the PO doesn't lose it).

    Quote Originally Posted by StarBright View Post
    ... the thing that gives it to you pushes the powder through your arm with air? I can't see that one working but they say it is
    I don't know about for Covid vaccination but they have been using needleless injections for a while now, and I expect they will soon be as common as the instant thermometers all doctors and hospitals now use.
    No dirty needles to dispose of, no 'needle-stick' injuries for helathcare workers, patients prefer not being punctured.

    Compressed air is the most common delivery, other methods like electrostaic osmosis or even laser injection can also be used.
    This is from 5 years ago, and things have moved on:
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4675000/

    PS. Technology has all gone Star Trek again; remember Scotty was always injecting Kirk (and other patients) in the neck with a compressed air 'needle'.
    Last edited by nukecad; 22-09-20 at 13:09.
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  4. #14
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    Blimey they have been watching too much Star Trek!

  5. #15
    Senior Member beau's Avatar
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    No the bowel test does not have to be kept in the fridge. Just do it and post the same day.

  6. #16
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    I got the 'shit kit' as well. This year is just endless fun. On flu vaccine here, my wife usually pays to have it done at Boots but because I was shielding she got it for free at the GP on Saturday. Procedure was a one-hour time slot, masked and arm exposed before entering room. She said distancing procedures were impeccable and surprisingly there was no one else there. She arrived about 5-10 minutes into the time slot and had presumed it would be busy.

    One odd thing is that although she was given the flu shot on my account I don't get mine until two weeks later even though I've been receiving it for over a quarter of a century being regarded as 'high risk' When I asked why I was told that because I'll be 65 before the end of next March I'm now classified as being in the 65+ age group and the vaccine is different to that used for younger people.

  7. #17
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    I think the two different types of adult flu injection started a couple of years ago, it's when Mrs May was PM the previous winter was the one where lots of people were queing in the hospital corridors. So she spent more money on them that year & it's stayed the same since then.

    The one for 65 & over has something in it that boosts immunity

    Yes I've just found it:

    Which type of flu vaccine should I have?
    There are several types of flu vaccine.

    If you're eligible for the flu vaccine on the NHS, you'll be offered one that's most effective for you, depending on your age:

    children aged 2 to 17 are offered a live vaccine (LAIV) as a nasal spray; the live viruses have been weakened so it cannot give you flu
    adults aged 18 to 64 are offered an injected inactivated vaccine; there are different types, but none contains live viruses so they cannot give you flu
    adults aged 65 and over are offered an injected inactivated vaccine; the most common one contains an adjuvant to help your immune system have a stronger response to the vaccine
    If your child is aged between 6 months and 2 years old and is in a high-risk group for flu, they'll be offered an injected flu vaccine because the nasal spray is not licensed for children under 2.

    Talk to a GP, practice nurse or pharmacist for

    The link is: https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/vaccin...uenza-vaccine/

  8. #18
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    Here's a coincidence - or was someone at our surgery reading this?

    Today I got a text about the Flu clinincs at our surgery.

    It sounds as if it will be very much like scotleag's experience above, probably they've all had the same guidance from the NHS?
    I hope the lack of queues is the same, previous flu clinics here have been pretty packed in the waiting room.

    For under 65's here its the 16th October between 2 pm and 3 pm for my surname group.

    No special distancing rules mentioned, it just says:
    "Patients will enter via the front door/wear a face mask"
    (The front door has been closed since the start of lockdown and everyone's had to use the rear entrance for appointments).
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  9. #19
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    They haven't been peeping have they?

    Perhaps it's in the front door & out the back door so you don't go back into a room with people in there.

    So far it's just our GP's that are making people que in the car park then

    It does not surprise me though

  10. #20
    Senior Member nukecad's Avatar
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    A one way system in and out does seem a good idea, if the surgery building layout allows.
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