Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: A slow day, but productive.

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wootton N. Lincs
    Posts
    612

    A slow day, but productive.

    Fine weather today, so tackled a bit of gardening.
    Managed to get 3 sets of sweetpea canes up and planted, including one spot where I had to dig out 6 square feet of periwinkle. That was the toughest part of the day!
    2 of the frames were planted with "Heaven Scent" which as you can guess is highly fragrant, and a mix of pastel colours, another one set is planted with "Pulsar" which is also scented but a single deep scarlet. These are all September sown and have been in the cold frame since the start of February, so very healthy, tough and hardened of. and not at all leggy.
    Still have more Pulsar to plant but tomorrow I will plant around a trellis/arbour/archway I made a year or 2 ago,~( not sure what to call it.)~ with Royal mixed White, pure white, long stems and heavily scented. That can mix with young Lonicera Japonica and the clematis on the other side.
    The seedlings are taking over the greenhouse. I think they have plans for world domination.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    1,483
    A day when frustration overtook common sense for me. Increasingly annoyed cuz I can't get hold of gardener and yet I KNOW weeds want pulling, seeds want planting & STUFF. Attacked the bush at btm of garden which was impeding smooth access in wheelchair.
    Sons reaction? "What have you DONE????!!!!". Okay I went a bit OTT with the loppers.....but the path is clear now!

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wootton N. Lincs
    Posts
    612
    Well a path is only a path if it can be used as one,so ...................
    More garden work today........working on clearing a weedy area that gets muddy in the wet, it is getting timber edgings, weed membrane and Cotswold Gold Buff chippings....Its actually the area in front of my greenhouse and my grand daughters play house, so it will be a much appreciated improvement.Also makes a proper boundary for a much bigger border on the other side of one of the timbers, so somewhere to plant some of the multitudinous seedlings and plantlets. They are far too healthy and verdantly rampant.
    My next door neighbour, who is 89 and who I do bits and things and shopping for, has informed me that, knowing I like plants, and knowing the ones I would like but have not got yet, has ordered me 3 lots of Japanese anemone, 3 lots of Johnson's Blue Geranium, some thyme, and on a whim, 50 dwarf gladioli.....Hmmmmmmmmmmmmm...Her generosity knows no limits..........However, the amount of room available to plant things in a reasonable position, does.
    Nevertheless, I will find room, and be pleased as Punch when they burst into flower..........

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    Shropshire
    Posts
    1,483
    Eeks! more work, maybe plant some in her garden! sounds like you got enough to spare there!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Wootton N. Lincs
    Posts
    612
    Well, a bit more progress today. An area outside my lean to greenhouse and across to the front of my Grandaughters play house have been left au naturelle for more than long enough. Its fine if you have a liking for nettles , docks, dandelions, thistles and bindweed for a pathway, but tends to turn to mud in wet weather. It doesn`t ( didn`t) imbue a sense of raw dignified nature, more a forlorn neglect.
    Plus it looked awful and was a breeding ground for weeds.
    So I had a plan. Which mainly involved someones else`s labour, seeing as I no longer have the wherewithal for such endeavours.
    The plan was, a treated timber edging, thick stuff, to separate the soil border from the path material, a step built in to define the slight change in levels, and a membrane then a path material.
    First I thought plum slate would look nice, but decided it was a bit dark and gloomy. pebbles or round gravel was out because it can be awful for a wheelbarrow, and I don`t like the way it is always shifting underfoot.
    In the end settled on a gravel I had not seen before, Cotswold gold buff, small irregular pieces that bed and lock together nicely to form a good firm path and are a deep tawny colour.
    The edging and weedkilling was done a couple of weeks ago and the membrane laid, step formed, and gravel ( one ton) laid this afternoon.
    I am very happy with the result.
    Another one ticked of the list!

Similar Threads

  1. Arghh. This is like slow torture!
    By flowerangelx in forum Benefits - help & advice on disability benefits, incapacity benefits, ESA and DLA
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 03-05-14, 10:24

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •